Twitter responds to Scalia with StayMadAbby and a half-dozen other hashtags

Abby may still be mad, but so is Twitter (Twitter of color?) and the hashtags keep piling up.

It all started (or rather, reignited a decade old debate) when U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia came under fire Wednesday for his comments about black students during oral arguments in a landmark affirmative action case.

Here’s what he said as quoted in the Chicago Tribune:

There are those who contend that it does not benefit African Americans to get into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less-advanced school, a slower-track school, where they do well,” Scalia said. He cited a brief that, he said, “pointed out that most of the black scientists in this country don’t come from schools like the University of Texas. They come from lesser schools” where they do not feel they’re being pushed in classes “that are too fast for them.”

Read More: John Lewis slams Justice Scalia for ‘prejudice’ against black students

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 10: Plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher speaks to the media after U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case on October 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. The high court heard oral arguments on Fisher V. University of Texas at Austin and are tasked with ruling on whether the university's consideration of race in admissions is constitutional. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 10: Plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher speaks to the media after U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case on October 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. The high court heard oral arguments on Fisher V. University of Texas at Austin and are tasked with ruling on whether the university’s consideration of race in admissions is constitutional. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

As news of his comments spread, the hashtag #StayMadAbby began trending off and on for two days on Twitter in response.

Abby, for the record, would be Abigail Noel Fisher, the petitioner in the landmark case who believes she was denied admission at UT Austin because a person of color was granted admission. And the expression “stay mad”…well that’s clear, but if you’re confused, consult the urban dictionary.

Students of color from the University of Texas and other institutions of higher learning began tweeting their accomplishments, degrees, occupations and general thoughts on the matter:

The dissent to Abby and Scalia is so strong, it couldn’t be contained to just one hashtag. If you want some variety, you can also checkout:

#BlackExcellence

#Scalia

#SlowTrackBlacks

#BlackandStem

#SCOTUS

#ScaliaFail

and of course,

#ByeScalia (again, if you have to ask…)

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