Morning talk: Black Lives Matter activists feud on Twitter

Shaun King, columnist for the New York Daily News, Morehouse grad and one of the names associated with the Black Lives Matter movement, was trending on Twitter yet again as a feud with fellow activists took over his feed on Sunday.

The feud is not easy to follow. It involved King, Deray Mckesson and Johnetta Elzie, three individuals who have each been intimately involved with Black Lives Matter.

Things got heated when Mckesson asked King via Twitter what became of funds donated to King’s now-defunct Justice Together organization. Mckesson indicated he was a former board member and had lots of questions about thousands of dollars in donation money. He said he only resorted to posting on Twitter because King had refused to acknowledge text messages or phone calls.

110123 Atlanta - Shaun King is among the cross-section of metro Atlanta residents about how they would grade the president's State of the Union address this week. King is the lead pastor of Courageous Church in midtown Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011. Vino Wong vwong@ajc.com

Shaun King, lead pastor of Courageous Church in midtown Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011. Vino Wong/ AJC

King responded with now-deleted Tweets, looping in Elzie. First he suggested Mckesson and Elzie hang out at the White House and with celebrities while he is writing important stories. Then King sent another tweet which indicated that Mckesson said he was tired of working with Elzie and that he hated half the women in the Black Lives Matter movement.

Elzie went after King and Deray went after King while also smoothing things over with Elzie.

In the midst of all this feuding, King’s followers have become increasingly vocal about his constant posting of police brutality videos. King contends they are necessary to keep the conversation going, but many of his followers are complaining that it feels more like exploitation.

It all ended (?) with this final tweet/apology from King who promised to circle back with more on Monday:

It wasn’t long ago that King made the national news amidst accusations that he is not African-American. King says he is bi-racial, though the man on his birth certificate was identified as a white man. King has said he is not sure the man listed on his birth certificate is his real father.

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