Didn’t get Adele tickets? Don’t despair, prepare to pay

And just like that, the great Adele ticket sale of 2015 is over.

Tickets to Adele’s Atlanta tour dates went on sale Dec. 17 at 10 a.m. and by 10:30, both the October 28 and October 29 shows at Philips Arena were sold out.

Related: Review of Adele’s new album “25”

The shows sold out “in record time…less than a half hour,” said Peter Conlon, president of Live Nation Atlanta. At this time, promoters don’t expect to add additional show dates.

The British singer just keeps on breaking records. Her one-hour NBC special on Dec. 14, Adele Live in New York City, had 11.2 million viewers and was the highest rated concert special in 10 years, according to Entertainment Weekly. And her album sold 5 million copies in the US alone. And yes, she can even bring together families:

So if you want to see Adele live in Atlanta, you’ll have to dive into the sometimes murky market of ticket reselling.

Currently, on SeatGeek.com, an online ticket aggregator, tickets start at $358 for the Friday night show and $455 for Saturday night. VividSeats.com has single tickets available starting at $268.

At the other end of the spectrum are a pair of third row floor seats for Friday priced at over $10,000 apiece. That same general area of seating goes up to more than $18,000 per ticket on Saturday night.

Buying from a secondary seller doesn’t have to be a bad experience, but obviously you’re going to have to spend a little more money. Be sure you buy from a reputable seller and make sure you read all the fine print to avoid scams.

Here again are some tips from Fan Freedom and other sources to help you have a good ticket buying experience when you’re shopping secondary sellers.

As you search for tickets, check each website’s URL to ensure you don’t get duped by an imposter. Bryson Meunier of VividSeats.com suggests checking company ratings with the Better Business Bureau and verifying ticket brokers are members of the National Association of Ticket Brokers, whose Code of Ethics requires members to adhere to basic consumer protections.

Brokers like TicketNetwork.com and StubHub.com have tickets at prices higher than face value, but perhaps not as high as you may pay for leftovers from the public sale or VIP packages.

Sellers like StubHub and All-Shows guarantee every ticket sold on their sites and will replace them or provide refunds to consumers if they receive the wrong ticket, their tickets are invalid or an event is canceled, says Fan Freedom. This may not be the case for all online ticket sellers.

In this image released by NBC, Adele performs at Radio City Music Hall in New York. The concert, "Adele Live in New York City," was televised on NBC on Monday, Dec. 14. Adele debuted her long-awaited album, "25," and it sold a whopping five million copies in just three weeks of release. (Virginia Sherwood/NBC via AP)

In this image released by NBC, Adele performs at Radio City Music Hall in New York. The concert, “Adele Live in New York City,” was televised on NBC on Monday, Dec. 14. Adele debuted her long-awaited album, “25,” and it sold a whopping five million copies in just three weeks of release. (Virginia Sherwood/NBC via AP)

You may have to pay fees when you buy from secondary sellers including buyer fees, shipping fees and fees that don’t seem to be for any reason other than charging a fee. Pay attention to your subtotal, says Fan Freedom, as it can change throughout the ticket buying process. Use a credit card in case you have to dispute any purchase.

Ticket limits and credit card entry restrictions may still apply to tickets purchased from secondary sellers. Be sure you know the restrictions that apply to the tickets you are buying no matter which website you buy them from.

As with anything you buy, you should comparison shop. Check online ticket aggregators like SeatGeek, which offers Deal Score, a proprietary system that analyzes and rates available tickets for sale online to show you which ones offer the most value for the money.

AJC staff writer Melissa Ruggieri contributed to this story.

Reader Comments 0

3 comments
AJCReaderX
AJCReaderX

"Buying from a secondary seller doesn’t have to be a bad experience, but obviously you’re going to have to spend a little more money."

A little more money?? A LOT more money.

This article is a bit disingenuous. The writer is trying to be helpful, but the fact of the matter is that companies like StubHub and SeatGeek are simply legitmized scalpers. Adele herself does not want you to buy tickets from these companies or actual scalplers:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/18/business/media/adele-moves-to-stop-scalpers-from-reselling-concert-tickets.html?_r=0 


StubHub, for one, has actively lobbied to roll-back anti-scalping laws.

If you want to support Adele and other artists, skip these thieves. Adele is young and will be back, God willing.  Scalpers should be scalped.

Needabailouttoo
Needabailouttoo

 I predict Adele's next album will be entitled 32, as in her age in years, as was her previous releases. With the top-selling album of all time belonging to her latest release, (and sales continue to be strong), with 56 US tour dates (unknown of the European and Asian date numbers), with high ticket prices charged by the original ticket seller, in our case, Ticketmaster, and obviously Adele taking a large percentage of each, this most acclaimed international singer of our time can afford to take the next 6 to 8 years off. While she'll still be in fine form in her mid-thirties, expect this entire cycle to repeat, with much higher 2024 ticket and album market prices. Already aware of all of the above, I forked over $450.00 + insurance ($26.00) for a single ticket to Ticketmaster, a price I've never considered paying before for any entertainer. What sold me was the 12/14 televised concert. In an age of lip-sinching and highly embellished recorded vocal tracks from all of the typical names, this singer is exceptional, her strong vocals are all her own, and Atlanta's concerts will be a rare entertainment event, not to be missed.

missj2u
missj2u

I think it's awful that brokers are able to snatch up all the tickets prohibiting fans from buying them directly from venue outlets before the markup costs! There has to be a way to prevent this but I suppose impacting the profits and fees of everyone involved prohibits implementing any of those measures.