Prince’s Paisley Park estate to become a museum

Prince’s Paisley Park estate may become the Graceland of the 21st century.

CHANHASSEN, MN - APRIL 22:  Music fans visit a memorial outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 22, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive yesterday at Paisley Park.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CHANHASSEN, MN – APRIL 22: Music fans visit a memorial outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 22, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive yesterday at Paisley Park. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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According to friends and family of the late singer, the $10 million estate in suburban Minneapolis will be turned into a museum to honor his legacy.

Prince died Thursday at the estate. On Saturday, a private memorial service was held for friends and family including Prince’s four living siblings and a host of musicians.

While Prince reportedly did not have a will, those closest to him say that he always planned to turn his estate into a museum for his fans.

“We will turn Paisley Park into a museum in Prince’s memory,” said the late singer’s brother-in-law, Maurice Phillips, 52, in an interview with the British newspaper The Sun. “It would be for the fans. He was all about the fans — this would remember his music, which is his legacy,” said Phillips, who is married to Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson.

Sheila E., a close friend of Prince who is planning a musical tribute to the musician, echoed Phillips in an interview with ET.

CHANHASSEN, MN - APRIL 23:  Music fans visit a memorial created outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 23, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive in an elevator April 21 at Paisley Park.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CHANHASSEN, MN – APRIL 23: Music fans visit a memorial created outside Paisley Park, the home and studio of Prince, on April 23, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive in an elevator April 21 at Paisley Park. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

“We’re hoping to make Paisley what [Prince wanted] it to be. [He] was working on it being a museum,” she said. “He’s been gathering memorabilia and stuff from all the tours, like my drums and his motorcycle.”

The 65,000 square foot building features several studios, live rooms, a meditation room, and some purple lighting.

“There’s a hallway of his awards and things, which he really didn’t care about too much, but he displayed it for the fans because he knows that they would want to see it,” said Sheila E. “There’s pictures of him all down the halls, some you’ve seen before and some never [seen]… There’s a mural on the wall with his hands out and on one side is all the people he was influenced by and the other side is all of us who have played with him… It’s beautiful.”

Reader Comments 0

16 comments
Kimberly Aguirre
Kimberly Aguirre

I thought that Prince did not want his home turned into a museum.

Deborah Scales
Deborah Scales

Did someone check in all of those guitars and piano in his house/studio for the Will? I cannot imagine that he never had one, especially knowing of his rightful heir, his full blooded sister having bouts with drug addiction. We do not want to see an open media sensationalized fight over Prince's music or money. Let him RIP! It was enough of a drama with the other great one, Michael Jackson. Let us hope who ever inherits the property does not deplete it of what would make it a musuem.

Al Sain
Al Sain

Not to mention all the mess with James Brown..it was 76 days before he was even allowed to be buried..

Mailey McLaughlin
Mailey McLaughlin

How is it that he didn't have a will? I don't understand why people don't get this extremely vital paperwork done to save their friends and family anguish, stave off spending money on lawyers, and make things easier. It doesn't matter how much wealth you have, or don't have. Do it! The guy was rich enough that his lawyers could have drawn it up, explained it to him, and had him sign it in minutes. If you love your family and friends, create a will.

Thomas Beane
Thomas Beane

I can not stress how right you are. Without a will, you have no inheritance rights. The state or corporations will take your estate. I know. I'm sitting here right now with all of my and my mother's stuff locked in a house that a corporation is telling me that I can't have, even though I lived there when she died. I'm being told that I have no legal rights to my own college diplomas.

Mailey McLaughlin
Mailey McLaughlin

So sorry you are dealing with that, Thomas Beane. It makes no sense not to do it, and saves those you love a lot of anguish.