Don’t fall for the latest Pokémon Go scam

NEW YORK, NY – JULY 11: A man plays Pokemon Go on his smartphone outside of Nintendo’s flagship store, July 11, 2016 in New York City. The success of Nintendo’s new smartphone game, Pokemon Go, has sent shares of Nintendo soaring. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The world doesn’t need another  Pokémon Go story, but this one is a public service announcement, so why not.

The week-old app that has become the latest craze has been blamed for everything from traffic accidents to muggings to murders to disrespect for the deceased and the holy.

NEW YORK, NY - JULY 11: A man plays Pokemon Go on his smartphone outside of Nintendo's flagship store, July 11, 2016 in New York City.  The success of Nintendo's new smartphone game, Pokemon Go, has sent shares of Nintendo soaring. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – JULY 11: A man plays Pokemon Go on his smartphone outside of Nintendo’s flagship store, July 11, 2016 in New York City. The success of Nintendo’s new smartphone game, Pokemon Go, has sent shares of Nintendo soaring. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Pokémon Go is a free app that allows iOS and Android users in the US, Australia, and New Zealand to chase and catch virtual  pokémon in real-world locations.

There are three main parts to Pokémon Go– catching pokémon; visiting pokéstops, (local landmarks where you can get items) and gym battles, which are major real-world areas like parks or tourist attractions where you can battle with other trainers.

Naturally, all the craziness has inspired a few hoaxes including a recent email scam that asks you to pay $12.99 per month to continue using the app.

The email appears to come from Niantic (co-creators of the app with Nintendo) and states that due to response to the app, the company needs more powerful servers and is therefore establishing a monthly fee. The email threatens to freeze the accounts of anyone who doesn’t upgrade.

It’s all a bunch of hooey as far as we know, so don’t click on any links in the email if you get one. According to Variety, the links lead to fake pages where the scammers would be able to capture users’ login information.

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